2013
04.29

After reading yet-another-uninformed-pro-vSphere blog post on a tech “news” site, I just have to say something.  Stop.  Please stop.  Today I read on Tech World that Microsoft does not have anything to compare with DRS.  Eh, Dynamic Optimization anybody?

EDIT: The latest last-gasp from a vFanboy was “Hyper-V does not have bare-metal host deployment”.  No it does not; VMM has that feature – and VMM 2012 R2 adds a hell of a lot more.  I bet ESXi doesn’t do bare-metal host deployment either, eh children?

Then there’s the package comparisons.  VMware’s packaging is a nightmare to figure out.  What feature is in what version of vSphere?  I don’t have a friggin clue.  Pricing vSphere makes choosing a phone plan or a health insurance plan look easy.  To be safe, the “journalists” (I reserve real use of that word for a very small subset of the tech news biz) choose Enterprise Plus, the most expensive SKU of vSphere.

How can we compare Hyper-V versus vSphere?

Microsoft SKU VMware SKU Comments Valid Comparison?
Hyper-V Server 2012 ESXi Free Free versus free, hypervisor only, with no guest OS licensing or host management bundled. Yes
Windows Server Hyper-V vSphere suites On the Microsoft side, you have Hyper-V with guest OS licensing bundled.  No central host management (VMM).
On the VMware side you have their hypervisor with no guest OS bundling PLUS central host management solution (vCenter).
No

The first comparison compares apples with apples.  The second, the one that lazy “journalists”, like those on TechWorld, choose to use.  It’s not a fair comparison.  Microsoft and VMware do not bundle their products in similar packages.  The missing piece from the Microsoft bundle is System Center – Virtual Machine Manager.  VMM is a central host management solution that does pretty much everything vCenter can do, and more.  But you can’t buy VMM on it’s own.  Let’s keep searching options …

Microsoft SKU VMware SKU Comments Valid Comparison?
Core Infrastructure Suite (CIS) or Enrolment for Core Infrastructure (ECI) vSphere suites Windows Server + all of System Center with host and VM licensing.
From VMware, we still only have host + host management licensing.
No
Core Infrastructure Suite (CIS) or Enrolment for Core Infrastructure (ECI) VMware vCloud Suite Enterprise Windows Server + all of System Center with host and VM licensing.
From VMware, we now have vSphere Enterprise Plus and a boat load of various management SKUs.
Close, but no

Comparing CIS/ECI to vSphere suites is *giggles* not fair to VMware – who thought I’d ever say that!?!?!?  In the Microsoft CIS/ECI stack you have all of System Center, a complete service delivery, cloud, backup, health monitoring, infrastructure deliver/management, and so on, for a automating data centre.

I don’t know the VMware stack – as I said, I find it completely confusing compared to the simple Microsoft bundling – but the vCloud suite seems to have a tonne of stuff in it. You could compare the $11,495 vCloud Suite Enterprise with $5,959.20 ECI bundle. You should remember that the price of Windows Server Datacenter for licensing your VMs in $4,809 per 2 CPU host.  That means that to run Windows Server VMs on your vSphere, your cost per 2 CPU host has gone up to $16,304.

So what about the apples-to-apples comparisons for the top end?  Then you need to compare:

Microsoft SKU VMware SKU Comments Valid Comparison?
Core Infrastructure Suite (CIS) or Enrolment for Core Infrastructure (ECI) VMware vCloud Suite Enterprise + Windows Server Datacenter Windows Server + all of System Center with host and VM licensing.
From VMware, we now have vSphere Enterprise Plus and a boat load of various management SKUs, and VM licensing.
Yes

In summary, Mr/Miss “journalist” for future apple-to-apple comparisons you should stick to one of the following:

  • Hyper-V Server versus ESXi Free
  • Microsoft ECI suite versus VMware vCloud Suite Enterprise plus Windows Server Datacenter

1 comment so far

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  1. I like your information.
    I have the same issue when I see comparisons of Hyper-V and ESXi, if they done there homework, which takes time and technical knowledge, we all could have a better picture of which hypervisor is good for you (the small, middle or large enterprise)

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