2012
01.20

If you read this blog or you follow me on Twitter then there is a very strong chance that you also read Hyper-V.nu and follow the crew from there on Twitter too.  They run a great online community that covers Hyper-V and System Center in the Netherlands.  A few months ago they asked if I would come over to speak about Windows 8 Hyper-V Networking at a day-long event they were hosting in the Microsoft offices in Amsterdam.  Well, of course I would.  They’re good guys and Hans Vredevoort was the tech reviewer on Mastering Hyper-V Deployment and is a major contributor to Microsoft Private Cloud.

The guys advertised the event, and within 2 days they’d filled all the seats.  Registrations came from the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, and UK, and there might be other countries I don’t know about.  It was a good day with technical content, demos, and laughs.

Jaap Wesselius and Peter Noorderijk kicked things off with the keynote, touching on some of the highlights of Windows Server 8 and the history, growth and success of their community.  Then it was me. 

Hans did a good session that went into detail on a small bit of the storage story.  There’s a lot to that story!  His demo was brave and it worked.  With a mix of PowerShell and GUI, he provisioned a storage pool and some spaces, demod a active/active file server cluster, created and permissioned a share, created a VM on a share, and did a live storage migration of a running VM from one share to another. 

Ronald Beekelaar did a deep dive on disk deduplication, talking about this new storage feature, explaining along the way the different methods and technologies that have been used up to now to get more data on disks.  “Chunking” seems to be the way forward!

Maarten Wijsman wrapped up the technical side of things with VMM 2012, talking about the pillars, creating a bare metal host, and explaining some of the features of service deployment.

Robert Bakker of Microsoft Netherlands wrapped the formal side of the event up talking about System Center 2012 and the licensing that was announced on Tuesday.

For me, the best bit was meeting a lot of people I’d not met in person before but “talk” to regularly on Twitter, and spending some time with some of the European community at dinner the night before.  I also got to meet some interesting people and heard what they are doing and experiencing.  That’s the great thing about community events … it’s content and people.  All in all, an excellent event.  I’m sure the guys will do more – you should register as soon as you can!

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