2011
11.30

It’s been a while since I last looked at my various sources outside of Twitter so I’m doing a bit of catch up:

On the Hyper-V front I’ve found:

Hyper-V settings hang after installing RemoteFX on Windows 2008 R2 Service pack 1

On a Windows Server 2008 R2-based computer that has Service Pack 1 (SP1) installed and has RemoteFX, Hyper-V VM settings will hang if following conditions are true:

  • When Domain Controller is installed on the same physical server as the RemoteFX server.
  • When the following Group Policy setting is enabled:
    Computer Configuration/Windows Settings/Security Settings/Local Policies/Security Options/Interactive Logon: Message text for users who are trying to log on.

You may also receive following error when you refresh the host on SCVMM console:

Error (2927)
A Hardware Management error has occurred trying to contact server <FQDN Server Name>.
(Unknown error (0×80338029))
The Hyper-V host status in SCVMM may show as "Not Responding".

An update that enables the Windows Developer Preview or Windows Server Developer Preview to be hosted in a Hyper-V virtual machine on Windows Server 2008 R2

Consider the following scenario:

  • You install the Hyper-V server role on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 R2.
  • You create a virtual machine on the Windows Server 2008 R2-based computer that is running the Windows Developer Preview or Windows Server Developer Preview, codenamed "Windows 8."

In this scenario, you may experience one or more of the following issues:

  • The Windows Developer Preview or Windows Server Developer Preview virtual machine stops responding.
  • The Windows Server 2008 R2 host computer displays a stop error message and restarts automatically. This behavior brings down all other running virtual machines together with the host computer.

Virtual machines stop responding (hang) during startup and the Vmms.exe process crashes on a Windows Server 2008 R2 computer that has the Hyper-V role installed

Consider the following scenario:

  • You are running some virtual machines on a Windows Server 2008 R2 computer that has the Hyper-V role installed.
  • These virtual machines are configured to start automatically when the management operating system (host operating system) starts.

In this scenario, some of the virtual machines stop responding (hang) when the management operating system (host operating system) is starting. These virtual machines remain in the "Starting" state and never complete starting. Additionally, the Vmms.exe process crashes, and the following event is logged in the Application log:

Log Name: Application
Source: Application Error
Date: Date_Time
Event ID: 1000
Task Category: (100)
Level: Error
Keywords: Classic
User: N/A
Computer: ComputerName
Description:
Faulting application name: vmms.exe, version: 6.1.7600.16385, time stamp: 0x4a5bc7c6
Faulting module name: ntdll.dll, version: 6.1.7600.16385, time stamp: 0x4a5be02b
Exception code: 0xc000000d
Fault offset: 0x00000000000d2d83
Faulting process id: 0×670
Faulting application start time: 0x01ca16803aef0602
Faulting application path: C:Windowssystem32vmms.exe
Faulting module path: C:WindowsSYSTEM32ntdll.dll

Note Date_Time is a placeholder for the date and time of the event occurrence, and ComputerName is a placeholder for the name of the computer.

You receive a "Stop 0x0000007E" error on the first restart after you enable Hyper-V on a Windows Server 2008 R2-based computer

Assume that you enable the Hyper-V role on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 R2. You restart the computer after you enable the Hyper-V role. However, you receive the following Stop error message during the restart operation:

Stop 0x0000007E (ffffffffc0000096, parameter2, parameter3, parameter4)
SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED

Notes

  • The parameters in these Stop error messages may vary, depending on the actual configuration.
  • The symptoms of a Stop error may vary, depending on your computer’s system failure options. For example, the computer may restart when a Stop error occurs.

The network connection of a running Hyper-V virtual machine is lost under heavy outgoing network traffic on a Windows Server 2008 R2-based computer

Consider the following scenario:

  • You install the Hyper-V role on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 R2.
  • You run a virtual machine on the computer.
  • You use a network adapter on the virtual machine to access a network.
  • You establish many concurrent network connections, or there is heavy outgoing network traffic.

In this scenario, the network connection on the virtual machine may be lost sporadically. Additionally, the network adapter is disabled.
Note You have to restart the virtual machine to recover from this issue.
This issue can also occur on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1. To resolve the issue, apply the hotfix that is described in one of the following Microsoft Knowledge Base articles:

2263829 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2263829/ ) The network connection of a running Hyper-V virtual machine may be lost under heavy outgoing network traffic on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1

Hyper-V Host Reports a Virtual Storage Device Error With Pass-through Disk

Consider the following scenario:
You are hosting a Virtual Machine configured with a SCSI attached Pass-through disk from a Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Host.
You attempt to monitor the performance of the Pass-through disk from the host OS using the following Performance Monitor Counter:
Hyper-V Virtual Storage DeviceError Count
You observe that the Error Count increases when the guest is booted or the guest is running.

MS10-010: Vulnerability in Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V could allow denial of service

Microsoft has released security bulletin MS10-010.

Hyper-V Time Synchronization Doesn’t Correct the System Clock in the Virtual Machine if it is more than 5 Seconds ahead of the Host Clock

The Hyper-V Time Synchronization Service will not correct the system clock in the virtual machine (VM), if the system clock in the VM is running more than 5 seconds ahead of the system clock on the host machine

You cannot import a virtual machine by using Hyper-v Manager or System Center Virtual Machine Manager (SCVMM) on a Hyper-V server

When you try to import a virtual machine that has been exported by using Hyper-V Manager, you cannot import the virtual machine by using Hyper-V Manager on a different Hyper-V server. Additionally, you receive an error message that resembles the following:

A Server error occurred while attempting to import the virtual machine. Failed to import the virtual machine from import directory <Directory Path>. Error: One or more arguments are invalid (0×80070057).

When you try to use System Center Virtual Machine Manager (SCVMM) to import a virtual machine that was exported by using Hyper-V Manager, you receive the following error message:

Error (12700) VMM cannot complete the Hyper-V operation on the <server FQDN> server because of the error: Failed to import the virtual machine from import directory <Directory Path>. Error: One or more arguments are invalid (0×80070057) (Unknown error (0×8005))

Adding the Hyper-V role in Windows Server 2008 R2 may cause a Stop 0x5C on reboot if x2APIC is enabled

Consider the following scenario:

  • You are running Windows Server 2008 R2.
  • You have Intel’s® x2APIC mode enabled in the BIOS or the operating system.
  • In Windows you enable the Hyper-V role and reboot the machine.

In this scenario, you may encounter a Stop error during boot that resembles the following:

STOP: 0x0000005C (0×0000000000007002, 0×0000000000000001, 0×0000000000000001, 0×0000000000000000)

CD-ROM device is no longer accessible after installing the Hyper-V Linux Integration Services in a Red Hat or CentOS virtual machine

Consider the following scenario:
· Red Hat or CentOS is installed in a Hyper-V virtual machine.
· The Linux Integration Services are installed in the virtual machine.
· After the Linux Integration Services are installed, the CD-ROM (/dev/cdrom) is no longer accessible in the virtual machine.
· If the Linux Integration Services are uninstalled, the CD-ROM is accessible in the virtual machine.

Hyper-V Export function consumes all available memory in Windows Server 2008 or in Windows Server 2008 R2

Consider the following scenario:

  • You install the Hyper-V role on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2.
  • You use the Export function to export some virtual machines (VMs) to a destination location.
  • The disk I/O transfer rate of the source disk is faster than the disk I/O transfer rate of the destination disk.

In this scenario, the available memory on the computer keeps decreasing. Additionally, the computer stops responding when the available memory is exhausted.

Hyper-V Integration Components on Windows Server 2003 Guests Do Not Function Properly

After performing a Physical to Virtual machine migration on Windows 2003, you may experience the following problem when attempting to install the Hyper-V Integration Components:

  • The Integration Component installer reports that everything installed correctly
  • In Device Manager, the Hyper-V devices ‘Data Exchange’, ‘Guest Shutdown’, ‘Heartbeat’, ‘Time Synchronization’, and ‘Volume Shadow Copy’ do not appear under System Devices
  • In Device Manager, the ‘Virtual Machine Bus’ and/or ‘Microsoft Emulated S3 Device Cap’ devices appear with a yellow exclamation point, and their properties show error code 37.
  • Integration services like the mouse, NIC, and graphics do not function properly
  • When the guest boots, you see a warning that one or more services did not start correctly

Hyper-V Live Migration fails on Windows Server 2008 R2 with Event ID 12080

When you perform a live migration of a Hyper-V virtual machine on Windows Server 2008 R2, the live migration may fail and the virtual machine will have a status of Migration attempt failed.
On the destination node, the following events will be logged in the Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-Worker/Admin event log:
Log Name: Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-Worker-Admin
Source: Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-Worker
Event ID: 12080
Level: Error
Description: ‘VMName’ Microsoft Synthetic Ethernet Port (Instance ID {BA8A5B0D-5A37-467B-8A5E-DD9262F52C9A}): Failed to restore with Error ‘The system cannot find the path specified.’ (0×80070003). (Virtual machine ID 6A205AEF-D566-4AC2-92E0-08431A711034)

Hyper-V virtual machines may not start, and you receive an error: “‘General access denied error’ (0×80070005)”

A Hyper-V virtual machine may fail to start and you receive an error that resembles the following:

An error occurred while attempting to start the selected virtual machine(s).
‘VMName’ failed to start.
Microsoft Emulated IDE Controller (Instance ID
{83F8638B-8DCA-4152-9EDA-2CA8B33039B4}): Failed to Power on with Error ‘General
access denied error’
IDE/ATAPI Account does not have sufficient privilege to open attachment
‘E:VMsVMNameDisk0.vhd. Error: ‘General access denied error’
Account does not have sufficient privilege to open attachment
‘E:VMsVMNameDisk0.vhd. Error: ‘General access denied error’

If you click See details, the following error is listed:

‘VMName’ failed to start. (Virtual machine ID
5FC5C385-BD98-451F-B3F3-1E50E06EE663)
‘VMName’ Microsoft Emulated IDE Controller (Instance ID
{83F8638B-8DCA-4152-9EDA-2CA8B33039B4}): Failed to Power on with Error ‘General
access denied error’ (0×80070005). (Virtual machine ID
5FC5C385-BD98-451F-B3F3-1E50E06EE663)
‘VMName’: IDE/ATAPI Account does not have sufficient privilege to open attachment
‘E:VMsVMNameDisk0.vhd. Error: ‘General access denied error’ (0×80070005). (Virtual
Machine ID 5FC5C385-BD98-451F-B3F3-1E50E06EE663)
‘VMName’: Account does not have sufficient privilege to open attachment
‘E:VMsVMNameDisk0.vhd. Error: ‘General access denied error’ (0×80070005). (Virtual
Machine ID 5FC5C385-BD98-451F-B3F3-1E50E06EE663)

Notes

  • This error message references either the Microsoft Emulated IDE Controller or the Microsoft Synthetic SCSI Controller.
  • This error message references either a virtual hard disk (.vhd) file or a snapshot file (.avhd).
  • The Virtual Machine ID is unique to each virtual machine.

And there are lots more like this on MS Support, but I’m tired now and I want to sleep Smile

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